Thursday, December 19, 2019

Suggested books & things to take to Main & Pre-Exam - EQE 2020

Preparation:
- Check the exam times and plan to arrive early
- Since EQE 2017, an additional 30 minutes has been given for papers A, B, C and D (REE OJ 2019 SE2 - page 41) to help candidates who do not have English, French or German as their mother language. The papers are designed to be made in the official REE duration (e.g. 5 hours for C and D) but an extra 30 minutes is given to make it at the exam (e.g. 5.5 hours for C and D).
- Read through the rules regarding the conduct of the exam (REE OJ 2019 SE2 - page 36-40). See the warning here about possible problems.
- See here what candidates said last year about the location where you are taking the exam
- Be well rested in the days before the exam - many D candidates sleep badly on Monday night
- Take a suitcase with wheels, and limit the books to ones you have used in the last 6 months of your preparation
- For the A & B papers, if you need more practice, do the Mock A (Examiners' Report) and Mock B (Examiners' Report) for additional practice. There is also a video explaining the philosophy behind the combined technology papers which were given for the first time at EQE 2017.
- From EQE 2020 onwards, no opposition form will be supplied with Paper C, and no form should be handed in with your answer. Elements which used to be explicitly required in the form to ensure admissibility (complying with A.99, A.100 and R.76 EPC) should be included in your answer on a sheet of EQE paper.
- For the D paper, the marks available for DII (used to be 60 marks) will be reduced from EQE 2020 onwards (epi information 4/18 - pages 25). It may be different each year - check before you start by looking on the front page of the exam. Expect either 50:50 or even 60 DI:40 DII.
- They are now more critical when awarding full marks for the legal citation (legal basis) in DI. See here for some rules of thumb for optimising marks for legal basis.
- If you need a little help on DII, this presentation provides a basic methodology and some explanation of what they are looking for
- After doing the papers of 2019, look at the Tutors' Report to help with interpreting the EQE Compendium (epi information 4/19 - pages 40-52)
- If necessary, look here for some tips for reducing anxiety at the exam
- Be prepared to do the exams with a relatively small (possible as small as 60cm x 90cm) space. Normally, you can place books you don't need under the table.
- Look through the EQE Study Guide for other tips

Wednesday, December 18, 2019

EQE Paper D: optimise your marks for legal basis

Many candidates waste time perfecting and double-checking each legal basis. This is a poor strategy - a lot of marks are also available for correctly solving the legal problems, for explaining (arguing) how you have applied the law, and for the legal advice part. In many cases, an alternative will be accepted, even if it is a "lower" legal source.

It is much more efficient to understand the basic principles of what is required and what is typically accepted, and then be pragmatic. You should then note the best citations you find as you consult your notes and books when answering. If you think you are missing something, make a note and come back at the end if you have time left.

(1) Recognise and note expected citations: although different sources may be cited (and are always considered for marks), the markers are mainly looking for references to the documents listed in IPREE Rule 2 & 22(1) (latest version: OJEPO 2019, SE2 - see below for the syllabus provisions). Make sure you are familiar with the contents of these resources.

(2) Recognise and note the most important citations: hierarchically, Articles, Rules, & G-decisions are the most important, and the most likely to get marks. Whenever you notice one of these, ALWAYS note it next to the argument being made.

(3) Learn the most frequently required provisions by heart: if you can cite these without looking them up, you can quickly score marks. These are the most frequent subjects of the legal questions, and can be found in the D Examiner's Reports of the last 10 years. Additional tip: tab these provisions in your reference books as there is a good chance you will need them.

  • EPC: A.14, R.3, R.6, R.157(2) | A.54(2), A.54(3) | A.65 | A.76, R.36 | A.87(1), A.87(4) | A.99(1), A.100, R.76(2), R.84(2) | A.108 | A.114(1), A.114(2) | A.121, R.135 | A.122, R.136 | A.123(2) | A.133, R.151 | A.141, R.51(1) | R.40 | R.45 | R.70(1) | R.114 | R.116 | R.126(2) | R.131(4), R.134(1) | R.137(5) | R.139 | Rfees 2(1)
  • Euro-PCT: A.153(7) | R.159(1), R.160 | R.164
  • PC: A.4C
  • PCT: A.8(1), R.4.10(a) | A.11(1) | R.19 | R.54bis | R.80.2, R.80.5 | R.90 | R.90bis

(4) Note the sources actually used: your answer should be explaining to the marker how you get to your conclusions. So if you apply principles from any "lower" resource such as EPO Guidelines, Case Law, OJEPO etc, cite any relevant Article, Rules, BoA decisions, AND the source reference. 

(5) Note the legal principle that you are applying: in general, rules are required more often than Articles - this is because they implement the legal principles found in the Articles. "Empty Articles", such as A.80 EPC or A.120 EPC are not required for full marks.

(6) Stop citing when the number of citations matches the number of marks: as a general rule of thumb, a statement is required with a supporting legal basis citation for each mark. So an 8 mark question requires approx. 8 citations for full marks.

(7) Cite alternative sources and unexpected documents when relevant: if you have nothing better quickly available, cite it. The marker will consider it, and use discretion. For example, a Guideline reference summarising a BoA decision is usually accepted instead the decision number. Using an exact word or phrase from a legal provision or case law (such as "accompanying person") may also be accepted as proof of the correct legal basis.

(8) Be aware that many PCT resources are not expected: the only PCT Guideline expected is GL/PCT-EPO (added in 2017 to IPREE Rule 22(1)). EQE 2019 was the first D Paper where a citation was expected for full marks. Unfortunately, these EPO-PCT Guidelines are not sufficient on their own for preparation or answering at the Exam - it is not complete (it does not cover EP entry at all), and in many sections, it just refers to parts of other documents. You should still know this document in detail - it contains relevant information about EPO policies under PCT, and identifies further PCT-related subjects, such as PCT-Direct or PPH, which may be asked in the D Paper.

(9) ... but still use the other PCT resources to answer questions: and cite when relevant. Applicant's Guide AG-IP & AG-NP and Euro-PCT Guide (EPG) are much more useful for studying and answering at the Exam. But, when answering with these "alternative sources", cite any relevant Article, Rules, BoA decisions, as well as the source actually used to answer.

(10) leave a comment below with your tip #10

Click for the relevant REE legal provisions

Which version of the EPO and EPO-PCT Guidelines to use for EQE 2020?

The syllabus is defined in Regulation on EQE (REE) A.13 and IPREE R.2 and R.22 (latest: OJEPO 2019,SE2). R.22 specifies that legal texts valid on 31 Oct in the year before the exam are relevant. This cut-off was intended to simplify EQE preparation, as the new versions of the EPO Guidelines (Guidelines for Examination in the EPO) and the EPO-PCT Guidelines (Guidelines for Search & Examination at EPO as PCT Authority) only enter into force on 1 Nov each year. So the "older" versions, published 18 months before the EQE, are the official ones.
In practice, the choice is more complicated - for your daily work, you need to be familiar with the most up-to-date versions, and preparing for the Pre-Exam and Main Exam are done in consecutive years, meaning that you may have to consider at least three versions. The EPO Guidelines may also be relevant for any paper, not just the legal part.

Option 1: use "older" (official) versions
- the versions valid on 31 Oct 2019, published on 1 Nov 2018.
- this seems straightforward, but OJEPO publications and legal changes between 1 Nov 2018 and 31 Oct 2019 still need to be monitored.
- also look through the changes made in the 1 Nov 2019 "newer" versions, as most of these are based on changes known in early 2019
- this is the version expected by the Examination Committees when a EPO or EPO-PCT Guideline reference is given


Option 2: use "newer" versions
- the versions which will still be valid on 31 Oct 2020, published on 1 Nov 2019 (note that these will be the official versions for EQE 2021).
- OJEPO publications and legal changes between approx. Apr 2019 and 31 Oct 2019 still need to be monitored as not everything may have been amended in the Guidelines. But there is less chance of missing anything.
- this is less preferred by the Examination Committees, but candidates are not penalized for using a newer version (this was confirmed at the Tutor's Meeting in October 2019), but the version (year) should be indicated at least once for each paper.

Conclusion:
- both options can be equally successful. 95% of the Guidelines are unchanged, and if you know them inside out, you will be able to answer most EPC-related questions.
- if you mark up your Guidelines, it is probably makes sense to use option 1 for the Pre-Exam and option 2 (same version) for the Main Exam one year later.

Reference books:
I have Indexed versions available here, which are compact in size, and simplify and speed up finding things. The index also indicates major updates made in the last 3 years:
- Indexed EPO Guidelines - "older" version (1 Nov 2018) or "newer" version (1 Nov 2019)
- EPO as PCT Authority - "older" version (1 Oct 2019) or "newer" version (1 Nov 2019)
--- this is a new reference book, which includes indexed versions of the EPO-PCT Guidelines and Euro-PCT Guide (EPG).

PCT Refs for EQE 2020 - Part I and II

Every year, on 31 Oct, WIPO produces a printable version of the complete Applicants Guide, including all annexes, specifically for the Pre- and Main Exams. The current version can be found here. But it is 2030 pages and much of it will never be required at the exam.

I have produced this abbreviated & improved version to lighten the load and to save a few trees. Using Regulations, past papers and comments from Examination Committees, I have limited it to adequately cover what you may need. In addition, I have added many useful overviews from the WIPO& EPO websites and OJEPO's which can speed up answering questions during the exam.

My book is available in two parts, and reflects the status on 31 Oct:
If ordered on paper, each must each be added to your basket separately.
- Part I - References 160mm x 230mm x 12mm - 375g - 380 pages
- Part II - Annexes 160mm x 230mm x 18mm - 565g - 580 pages
UPDATE 03 Jan 20: A4 versions can also be downloaded free of charge from the same page if you wish to print them yourself.

Part I: References
- Useful overviews from WIPO website
- PCT/PC/WTO Treaty memberships
- Overviews of fees
- Latest versions (11 July 2019) of AG-IP and AG-NP, with my Detailed Table of Contents
- New: FAQ's on Contingency Upload Service, A.19 & A.34 amendments, R.49.6 Reinstatement, Third-Party Observations
Part II: Annexes
- Annex B, C, D, SISA, and E info for selected international Authorities
- National Chapters for selected DO/EO's

National Law & Validation for EQE 2020

For the D paper, it is important to have up-to-date details from the National Law tables, particularly if there is a DI question on the translation requirements after grant, for example.

Unfortunately, the printed version of the National Law book is no longer available from the EPO. The latest version from Oct 2019 (360 pages) is here and can be printed on A4 paper yourself. But, not everyone likes the horizontal tables, and the small font makes it difficult to read if printed on A5 paper.

I have produced an up-to-date version using the latest info from the EPO website. Tables I and VIII are irrelevant for the EQE, so leaving them out saves 150 pages. I have added an index, page numbers and included the validation overviews published in the OJEPO for Morocco, Moldova, Tunisia and Cambodia.
New this year: the page size is 10% bigger to improve readability; the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (MK) is now North Macedonia (MK); and mention is made of Georgia (GE) signing a validation agreement on 31-10-19, but it is not yet in force.

My book is 380 pages, 160 x 230mm x 12mm, 375g, printed on thin (50g paper) double-sided paper. The link is on my patent firm's website.

Most of the contents are sourced from EPO websites and Official Journal, and no copyright is claimed for these parts.

Good luck at the EQE,
Pete Pollard

Sunday, October 6, 2019

Stand-alone book version of EPC.App available through Amazon

The IP.appify platform allows you to fine tune and build your own legal reference for both EPC and PCT, that will never be outdated.
As an alternative to working on-line, the EPC part is also available as a stand-alone book with basic author's comments (and cross-references) on Amazon (.de or .com or .co.uk)
UPDATE: Nov 2019 version now available in English or German at Amazon UK or Amazon DE

This basic version already includes enough comments and references to answer most of the questions at the EQE if you have studied, and are familiar enough with the law to be able to find relevant articles and rules. See my review of last year's edition, which I used to answer the EQE 2019 D paper. It should preferably be further annotated during study before the exam.

This does not include PCT.
UPDATE: PCT is now available both on-line and as a stand-alone book. The PCT book is more extensively annotated, with more explanations than the EPC book. It is intended as a book for daily practice, or for studying in preparation for the EQE. It is also suitable for using at the EQE as the logical structure allows the relevant parts of the law to be found quickly.

1st Edition of PCT.App now available (online and as a book)


After a lot of effort, both making content as well as adapting the platform (thanks to Till Andlauer, Stefan Ahlers, Thomas Eißfeller), we have finished the first edition available of the PCT. App. Finally, a tool is available that can deal with a convoluted treaty like PCT.
UPDATE: we have just performed some major updates
This is the book that I wish had been available when I was first studying PCT. The main organisation of the Articles and Rules is based on topics, and not on numerical order, although I have kept the order of Articles as much as possible. Within each topic, the most relevant Article, Rules and pieces of Articles & Rules are shown. Where necessary, Administrative Instructions have also been included. Clickable cross-references are included demonstrating how the law is arranged, as well as external links to simplify studying.
It includes my comments as author, with summaries and explanations of how things work, but coupled to the law to illustrate the legal basis for what is going on. It also includes legal analysis and interpretation of key articles and rules for legal practitioners. Comments are also included about the WIPO organisation and amendment of the Treaty.
The PCT.App platform is a perfect platform for fine tuning your own legal reference using - you can jump around the law using links, go to external sections of the different guidelines to learn, hide author comments that you do not need, add both in-line and adjacent comments, highlight and underline important parts. The IP.appify platform allows you to generate pdf's so that you can print your reference.
UPDATE: Now available on Amazon as a stand-alone book in English at Amazon (.de or .co.uk). It includes extensive comments, summaries and annotations by me as author to speed up understanding of how PCT works. It is intended as a book for daily practice, or for studying in preparation for the EQE. It is also suitable for using at the EQE as the logical structure allows the relevant parts of the law to be found quickly.
The EPC.App stand-alone book with basic author's comments on EPC is already available on Amazon (.de or .com or .co.uk) - see post here.


Sunday, July 28, 2019

EQELIBRIUM camps - learning by doing EQE papers

A vital part of any exam preparation is to practice exams. At the EQE, you will need to make a thousand micro-decisions on each paper about where to start, what you need to do, in which order to do it, what to write, what not to write, things not to be forgotten and when to stop. You need to deal with all the details as you concentrate on the big picture. And you need to take into account your own strengths and weaknesses.
The EQELIBRIUM mock camps, founded by Łukasz Bogdan, provide a good environment for learning this - by solving papers in a group, you benefit from the ideas and insights of others. Just as important is the social aspect - you spend a few days in the Polish mountains with other candidates who have similar issues and struggles. In particular, non-native speakers and re-sitters benefit a lot from considering different points of view.
I have heard that the first camps were like an "EQE Airbnb", where candidates stayed at someone's house, spending the whole day doing papers and cooking meals together :-).
I am very happy and proud to take part in this initiative to build a knowledge-sharing community. The scheduled camps (at a hotel close to Wroclaw) for both Pre-Exam and Main Exam papers are:

Saturday, July 27, 2019

Review: using EPC.App for Paper D - EQE 2019

I was immediately enthusiastic about EPC.App as it supports different uses by different types of candidate. To answer legal questions efficiently, you need to be able to find details (like procedural acts, time limits & references) quickly and accurately. Traditionally, either you make your own reference book or you learn to use (& annotate) a book written by someone else.
EPC.App supports both approaches and everything in-between: a digital, cross-referenced version of the EPC is provided with extensive standard notes, mark-up and comments from the editors. The standard notes were used by them to pass their EQE's, and also include links to Articles & Rules, OJEPO's, case law & guidelines.
The main structure is based on the Articles, followed by the relevant Rules. As you study on-line, hyperlinks allow you to open the resources, to make summaries and to add your own annotations. Standard notes can be hidden, so you can create a reference only covering the issues that you have difficulty with. If you need more explanation, you can make it and add it yourself. And you can put annotations next to the Article and/or Rule that you think is most logical. Just before the exam, you export it as a pdf and print it. As it becomes your reference, you can find the details a lot quicker at the exam.
To try out the book, I used only the standard EPC author's notes for the benchmarking of Paper D in 2019. See below for more details of the version I used, what I quickly found and what I did not find. PCT was not included in 2019 editions, but I am working with the editors to make PCT.App, which will be available for EQE 2020.
** Update 1 Oct 2019: 1st edition of PCT.App now available on-line, updated stand-alone EPC.App book available

Thursday, February 28, 2019

EQE 2019 - Paper C

I sat the paper under exam conditions in Munich as a bench marker to give the examination committees some materials for their marking discussion. If you want to try the paper yourself, here are the compendium copies in English, French & German.

This paper was much more manageable than last year - it was possible to do some attacks during the reading, and once you had read the documents, it was clear where a lot of the pieces should approximately go. It was a lot of work to finish -  I had to cut my inventive step attacks and explanation down to the key points only. I heard from a couple of people that it was impossible to finish, but they had the feeling that they had done enough to pass (assuming they were on the right track).

The last day of the EQE is hard going, with a tired brain and tired hands from writing. I got up a little late, so I didn't have time to iron my shirt. I got to the exam on time, annoyed that I would have to sit there the whole day in my wrinkled shirt. And then I opened the exam to read all about irons and steam irons 😄. I wonder if it is based on a Philips Electronics case - there was an address in The Netherlands, and Eindhoven was mentioned where I am based.

See below for more comments and possibly some spoilers

EQE 2019 - Paper B

I sat the paper under exam conditions in Munich as a bench marker to give the examination committees some materials for their marking discussion. If you want to try the paper yourself, here are the compendium copies in English, French & German.

Again a mix of mechanical, physical and chemical aspects. Very simple technology - solar cookers. In structure, this felt to me like a chemical paper - I managed to sort the pieces out, but I was not sure exactly what direction to take. Normally, in an EQE paper, most of the issues are clear enough decide using an 80/20 weighting, but here I had several 50:50 issues. Also with the support for the main amendment I took. I also struggled with inventive step. The reactions from others was a little mixed - they were unsure about their answer.

I may not be the best person to judge - I always have problems with paper B😲. I only passed it on my 2nd attempt at the EQE, and for a similar paper as a Dutch patent attorney, I had to take it 3 times.

See below for more comments and possibly some spoilers

EQE 2019 - Paper A

I sat the paper under exam conditions in Munich as a bench marker to give the examination committees some materials for their marking discussion. If you want to try the paper yourself, here are the compendium copies in English, French & German.

The invention, a cell culture container (such as a multi-well plate) is something you could get in real-life to protect: the mechanical aspects need to be claimed, taking into account the chemical and biological aspects. This is a positive aspect of the current combined technologies format (this is the third year) - they prepares candidates who are specialised but have a broad understanding of the main issues when patenting other technical areas.
This is a nice mechanical paper for chemists to practice. The independent device claim emerges very quickly, but there are a lot of refinements for each feature to consider claiming. The mechanical paper issue of getting more than one embodiment under a single claim is included, but the flow of the information is steady and manageable. Very consistent wording used. The mechanical terminology (and understanding) is not difficult. There is a lot of work to do, but the paper does a good job of guiding you to your answer. Other people I talked to had similar comments, and the feeling was generally good.

See below for more details and possibly some spoilers.

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

EQE 2019 - Paper D

I sat the paper under exam conditions in Munich as a bench marker to give the examination committees some materials for their marking discussion. If you want to try the paper yourself, here are the compendium copies in English, French & German.

I thought it was a very good D paper - the DII had a classical feel with a limited number of issues to deal with, but still a lot of options to think through and to advise about. The technology was very simple to understand, and there were limited dates to fit in your timeline. I may have missed something obvious😉, but I thought the DII was very well constructed. No loose threads or time-killing legal issues - it fits together like some of the older papers. A lot of work to get through, but possible to get  the main parts within the time.
The DI questions had a good mix of familiar legal issues and new ones (new to the exam). Both the DI and DII had some parts that you could spend a lot of time on, but time management is a key skill on all the papers. You need to sometimes to force yourself to stop what you are doing and to move on, even if you feel like you have more to write. A noticeable amount of PCT, but most of the legal issues have either been on the exam before, or are relatively well-documented.

Most of the people I chatted to afterwards were very happy with this paper. Only the time - some overran in DI and some overran in DII. I still had quite a few things I could have written in some parts, but I had to skip them to get further in the paper.

See below for more details and possibly some spoilers.

Monday, February 11, 2019

Possible questions on "recent" legal changes - EQE 2019

The law being tested at EQE 2019 is theoretically the status on 31 Oct 2018 in the year before the exam. Unless specified otherwise, "today" on the exam is the actual day of the exam (25th - 28th Feb 2019), so the law of 31 Oct 2018 should be applied to these situations. In particular, fee amounts valid on this date should be used when specifically required to answer a question.

Make sure your legal references are up-to-date and you are aware of recent changes. See here for my overview of recent releant EPC changes and an overview of recent relevant PCT changes. I have also included my comments about whether a question is likely or not - I have no insider knowledge, it is based on experience with previous exams.

Changes in 2016 are also included as there is usually one DI question (or an aspect of DII), and at least one Pre-exam Legal Question, directed to a "new" subject or a "recent" legal change. As each exam takes up to 2 years to make, these may not seem new or recent to you. For example, in DI 2018, G3/14 was asked for the first time.  The decision by the Enlarged Board in that case was taken on 25 Mar 15, and it was published in the OJ EPO in November 2015.

They also added the EPO PCT Guidelines to the official list of EQE texts  about 2 years ago, so some topics fom here could also be expected. Most of the contents are found in other references, like the Euro-PCT Guide, the standard EPO Guidelines or in OJ EPO notices. Two subjects that are explained here in more detail include:
-- PPH (Patent Prosecution Highway) - E-III, 1 - 3 (See here for a copy of the chapter & a relevant OJ EPO)
-- PCT-Direct - A-IV, 1 and B-IV, 1.2 (See here for a copy of the chapters & a relevant OJ EPO)

So, familiarise yourself with the changes from 2016 and early 2017 as well.

Good luck!

Saturday, February 9, 2019

Suggested books & things to take to Main & Pre-Exam - EQE 2019

Note: updated 11 Feb 2019 2110 with new (complete)overviews of EPC & PCT changes

Preparation:
- Check the exam times and plan to arrive early
- Since EQE 2017, an additional 30 minutes has been given for papers A, B, C and D (REE OJ 2019 SE2 - page 41) to help candidates who do not have English, French or German as their mother language. The papers are designed to be made in the official REE duration (e.g. 5 hours for C and D) but an extra 30 minutes is given to make it at the exam (e.g. 5.5 hours for C and D).
- Read through the rules regarding the conduct of the exam (REE OJ 2017 SE2 - page 36-40). See the warning here about possible problems.
- See here what candidates from last year said about the location where you are taking the exam
- Be well rested in the days before the exam - many D candidates sleep badly on Monday night
- Take a suitcase with wheels, and limit the books to ones you have used in the last 6 months of your preparation
- If you need a little help on DII, this presentation provides a basic methodology and some explanation of what they are looking for
- For the D paper, the marks available for DII (used to be 60 marks) may be reduced from EQE 2020 onwards (epi information 4/18 - pages 25). For EQE 2019, it will be unchanged (60 marks), but they are becoming more critical when awarding full marks for the legal citation (legal basis) in DI.
- After doing the papers of 2018, look at the Tutors' Report to help with interpreting the EQE Compendium (epi information 4/18 - pages 26-33)
- For the A & B papers, don't forget to do the Mock A (Examiners' Report) and Mock B (Examiners' Report) for additional practice. There is also a video explaining the philosophy behind the combined technology papers which were given for the first time at EQE 2017.
- If necessary, look here for some tips for reducing anxiety at the exam
- Be prepared to do the exams with a relatively small (possible as small as 60cm x 90cm) space. Normally, you can place books you don't need under the table.
- Look through the EQE Study Guide for other tips

Instructions to Candidates - EQE 2019

The EPO just published the up-to-date version of the Instructions to Candidates, including the restrictions on scissors, and the fact that the announcement before the end of time for the Pre-Exam will be 10 minutes so that you have time to fill out the answer sheet. For the Main Exam papers, it is 5 minutes, so you have time to put the answer pages in order and number them.

  • Don't be tempted to keep writing when they announce the end of the exam. If they come to collect your paper and you are still writing, they will not collect it. Even numbering of pages is not acceptable.
  • Make a note of the number of pages you hand-in for each Main Exam. They will send you a copy of your answers (unmarked) within a couple of weeks - check then that all the pages you handed in have been copied and are complete.
  • If you have use cut and paste for part of your answer, make sure the pieces are well stuck, and there is not excess glue which will cause pages of your answer to get stuck together. When you receive a copy of your answers,check that everything has been scanned properly.
  • Take an A4 envelope with you to hand-in your phone - see this earlier post.
Good luck!

Thursday, January 17, 2019

The thin paper is available again

Good news - for new orders of my Study Materials, the following will be printed on thin (50g) paper:

My printable National Law Book for EQE2019

For the D paper, it is important to have up-to-date details from the tables, particularly if there is a DI question on the translation requirements after grant, for example.

Unfortunately, the printed version of the National Law book is no longer available from the EPO. The latest version from Oct 2018 (360 pages) is here and can be printed on A4 paper yourself. But, not everyone likes the horizontal tables, and the small font makes it difficult to read if printed on A5 paper.

I have produced an up-to-date printable version - downloadable from my patent firm's website - using the latest information from the EPO website which has a bigger font. Tables I and VIII are irrelevant for the EQE, so leaving them out saves 150 pages. I have added an index, page numbers and included the validation information published in the OJEPO for Morocco, Moldova, Tunisia and Cambodia.
New this year: headers on each page indicating the table shown, better formatting, additional banners to show the different sections of the tables, and a useful overview of states showing dates of accession to Paris, EPC, PCT, PCT national entry time limits, whether PCT national routes are closed and whether validation is automatic after grant. The EPO has also added a new table VI. B renewal fees after successful petition for review.

My book is 430 pages - to save paper when printing, it should be printed with 2 pages on each side of an A4.

For those who cannot easily print out several hundred pages, you can also order a copy on double-sided A5 paper.
Update (17/1/19): the thin paper is availabe for new orders. See the links on my patent firm's website.

Most of the contents are sourced from EPO websites and Official Journal, and no copyright is claimed for these parts.

Good luck at the EQE,
Pete Pollard